Animal Assisted Therapy: Assisted is NO accident!

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Pella: Aurora Police Dept.

I took a lot from the Transforming Trauma: Methods for Animal Assisted Interventions, but like any conference, it’s the message you don’t expect to bring home that stays with you and is most powerful.  My prior blog provided an overview of the conference and some of the key take home messages I had and each of those messages are so very important, thoughtful and thought provoking.  I attended this hoping to learn more about AAT and Child Trauma and oh boy I most certainly did learn.  You know what though, I learnt something so very important for the success of AAT that I hadn’t previously considered and I’m so glad I heard this before venturing into AAT in my own work.

Aubrey Fine stated that first and foremost “animals require very skills therapists alongside them”.  The animal is “not a magic bullet on their own” and that in order to do the work properly, professionally and most ethically the human therapist – must be so very well skilled in their field and able to be attuned to picking up the nuances in the human animal interaction.

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Daniel & I

The other take home message for me, was the importance of the welfare of the animal.  This was repeated over and over again during the conference.  As trauma therapists, we all get tired, overwhelmed by the stories we hear and the work that we do.  We seek out supervision, health and wellbeing time and take self care.  It is unfair of us to think that our dog, horse, bird or guinea pig can go back to back in session all day without thought being given to their wellbeing.  As Aubrey Fine said “this work is very demanding on the animals”.  Rise VanFleet said something that will always guide me as I move forward in my exploration of clinical AAT; “the animal must enjoy the majority of interactions and not just tolerate it”.

As I see it, as an animal assisted therapist you need to be a skilled clinician, respect your animal colleagues and be able to manage the multiple relationships that come to exist in the room: you and the client, the client and the animal, you and the animal and the triad relationship.  I suspect a lot of people are drawn to the idea of an animal in the room with them and think it’s easy and just about having the animal there, but you know what? I’ve learnt that this is a very special and demanding style of working that requires unique skill and clinical maturity to really get the best out of the work.

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