Month: July 2014

Greater and Less Than – Lessons in learning Through Movement

Somatosensory activities and education, this is a topic close to my heart.

GREATER THAN

For a little over two years now I have been consultant and then project manager of a pilot project in Australia looking at the inclusion of patterned, repetitive somatosensory activities in primary school classes.

So often we hear teachers and educators ask about strategies for managing traumatised children and their resultant behaviours in the classroom.   All too often in my clinical practice teachers have looked at me, perplexed when I suggested they could include somatosensory activities into curriculum.  In fact I had almost got to the point that I believed this maybe wasn’t achievable and that I had to enlist an education champion to help me articulate my meaning more clearly.  The latter may still be the case, but in Charlotte NC I had the professionally heart warming experience of watching a relatively new teacher to the Alexander Youth Network (AYN) Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility (PRTF) School do exactly what I’ve been talking about for years.

The PRTF School do what most neurodevelopmentally and “trauma” informed education programs do, by providing frequent “brain breaks” for their children.  Essentially this is where they step down from academic learning and engage in some form of somatosensory activity such as playing outside, water play, sand play, play doh, calming corners with sofas, bean bags, blankets and soft toys etc. They do this routinely, repetitively and frequently – in fact given the arousal and dysregulation of the children AYN sees in its PRTF, these breaks seemed to work best when applied every 10 or so minutes.  Having access to a staff member dedicated to leading these breaks and co-regulating the children in between them worked a treat as well.   All of this impressed me, but what really stood out was this one teacher who found a way to incorporate somatosensory activities into curriculum based learning!IMG_7140

You know maths and mathematical concepts is a difficult gig at any school, let alone a classroom of children struggling with emotional, social and behavioural difficulties.  So when this teacher came in to teach the concepts of less than and greater than I thought to myself this will be interesting.

Immediately on entry into the room, she invited the children to the front of the class and had them all stand or sit around her as they preferred. She didn’t get flustered or annoyed when children came and went from her teaching space and in doing so, actually appeared to manage keeping them around her and in the vicinity of learning for the whole exercise.  Each child was given a piece of paper containing a number, each child read their number out aloud.  The greater than symbol was drawn on the board and there was minimal question and answer time to ensure that everyone understood the concept of the greater than symbol.

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Less than & Greater than

Then engaging the students in an activity based process, moving them around she asked them two by two (based on those most engaged in the moment) to identify their number and stand either side of her – as she held the greater than symbol.  The student’s task – to put themselves in the right spot – who’s number was greater than the other.  Each student excitedly took their turn and much celebration was had as each pair got it right.  In addition to the movement which we know provides sensory and motor based regulation to the lower parts of the brain, this teacher relied on her voice to ensure up regulation and down regulation in the moment and what was most impressive was that she made the lesson punchy and brief.  In and out in no more than 15  minutes and a key mathematical concept was taught and grasped by these children.

Can somatosensory activity be incorporated into curriculum?

I think it can.  It might take a bit of creativity and planning, and maybe even a shift in basic education philosophy about how to teach children, but I still think this is very achievable.

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Alexander Youth Network

 

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In the last week of May I journeyed to beautiful Charlotte in North Carolina to spend the week with my colleagues at Alexander Youth Network (AYN).  AYN’s main campus or headquarters, and the home of it’s Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility (PRTF) and one of their Day Treatment Programs, is located on a picturesque 60 acre property with buildings nestled in a woodland area with open grounds and recreation areas for their clients.  This campus also houses facilities including a gym, indoor swimming pool and cafeteria.

AYN is a non profit community based organisation receiving funding from fees for services (medicaid, insurance and the like) as well as contributions from individuals, corporations, foundations and government agencies.  AYN serves children ages 5 to 18, who are referred from hospitals, physicians, parents, schools and from state and county organisations such as department of social services and juvenile justice.  AYN serve over 7000 children each year.

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Surrounding woodlands

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Woodland Trail

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Deep in the woodland trail

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Alexander Youth Network Grounds

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Onsite Playgrounds

AYN provide an array of mental health treatment for serious emotional and behavioural difficulities including: diagnostic and outpatient services, community based programs, multisytemic day therapy, therapeutic foster care and an onsite, 36 bed psychiatric residential treatment facility.  The idea being that children, young people and families accessing their services can move from service to service with established working relationships of trust within the one organisation.  Added to this is the strong grounding the staff have in child development, trauma, attachment and neurodevelopment as a core component of their orientation and ongoing training.

AYN array diagrams 2012

It was a contrast to go from services that have decisively removed themselves from the medicaid system or appear to have more flexibility than is given from the public health system and as a result appear better funded and able to provide longer term intervention for their clients.  At AYN the financial resourcing struggle of service delivery was evident in comparison to the private services I had visited.  While the AYN staff were at times a bit despondent about this, I was nonetheless impressed at what they were offering and able to offer.  There is something about not having resources at your fingertips that can contribute to a creative resourcefulness and the team at AYN do this well.  In fact when it comes to neurodevelopmentally informed and respectful interventions AYN have lots to offer:

  • Individual therapy including EMDR, play therapy, sand tray and an awesome play room furnished largely by donation and financial grants
  • Art Therapy including pottery and their very own kiln
  • A ropes course for adventure therapy
  • A Labyrinth
  • Occupational Therapy with a motor and sensory furnished room including a swing and tunnels.
  • Physical Therapy
  • Reiki
  • Swimming
  • Vegetable and flower bed gardens and gardening program
  • Woodland walking trails
  • Playgrounds
  • Gym
  • Developmentally matched classrooms that afford children regular (every 10 – 15 mins) brain breaks and recreation
  • Classrooms that are highly sensory and provide calming, alerting and regulating activities including rocking chairs, bean bags, chill out areas and such
  • Bike program whereby each PRTF child has their own bike.

 

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Art Therapy room including Kiln

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Play Therapy Room

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Play Therapy equipment

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Play Therapy Room – role play and dress ups

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Play Therapy puppets

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Play Therapy sand tray and figures

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Occupational Therapy room

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Developmentally matched classrooms

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Chill out area in classroom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of more concern to me than their financial resourcing issues, were the systemic restrictions being placed on AYN in relation to the length of service delivery they are able to offer their clients.  The public health system funding children coming into the PRTF, those clients with the most serious of emotional and behavioural disturbances, are placing pressure on the service to treat and “repair” these children in 3 months.  The years of clinical practice, much of the theory out there, and my more recent acquisition of neurodevelopment and trauma expertise have taught me that it takes more than 3 months to form a trusting relationship with some of these kids.

 And we know that it is only in the context of such trusting relationships that these children can being to heal.

So with that knowledge I take my hat off to my colleagues at AYN and their ability to work within a public health system that places considerable restraint on their ability to really heal these kids.  The staff I met talked openly of the 30 day review process they have to undertake to retain or regain funding for ongoing work and the associated challenges. Despite this, the passion and commitment for their work and the children and families they serve sees them rise daily to these challenges and provide meaningful connections and healing opportunities for North Carolina’s more vulnerable citizens.