Sensory toys

Mount Saint Vincent Home

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Mount Saint Vincent Home

In stunning Denver Colorado, surrounded by snow capped mountain ranges, I spent the week of 2nd to 6th June 2014, at Mount Saint Vincent Home. This was my second visit to Mount Saint Vincent in as many years and approaching the gateway on my first day, for the first time in weeks, I felt a sense of familiarity and connection.

Mount Saint Vincent Home is located  just a short bus ride from downtown Denver and is situated on a 16 acre property, offering a running track, football field, multiple playgrounds and a swimming pool.  Founded by the Sisters of Charity Leavenworth Kansas in 1883, Mount Saint Vincent had it’s origins as an orphanage.  With social change and the move away from orphanage based care to out of home foster care and residential treatment, Mount Saint Vincent moved with the times and now prides itself on being a treatment center for children ages 3 – 13 years.

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Mount Saint Vincent specializes in treatment of children who have suffered abuse, neglect, trauma and/or mental illness, offering services with a child-focused but family centered approach acknowledging the importance of the family in a child’s healing and recovery.  Referrals to Mount Saint Vincent Home come largely from the County Human Services Department of Child Protection, School districts and other mental health services.

 Mount Saint Vincent offers a variety of services to clients including:

  • A 36 bed residential treatment program consisting of 3 cottages each housing 12 children
  • Individualised day treatment programs for up to 55 children
  • In home treatment and follow up services
  • K – 8 School program that affords children developmentally matched education rather than chronological determined education.
  • An early learning child care program

All of the services offered by Mount Saint Vincent operate under their treatment philosophy that focuses on the regulation of a child rather than compliance; that care is developmentally appropriate and matched and that they afford a child an environment of safety that allows children to ‘try on’ and develop positive relationships.

Mount Saint Vincent has some very innovative service elements including:

  • Creative Arts Therapy team who provide music therapy, dance/movement therapy and art therapy;
  • An animal assisted therapy program onsite using dogs and guinea pigs and offsite using horses
  • An onsite volunteer tactile therapy program offering clothed massage, yoga, meditation/mindfulness, bach flower remedies and reiki for example.
  • Individual Therapy
  • EMDR
  • Swimming
  • Bike Riding
  • Gym
  • Group Therapy Programs including Lego Group and Psychodrama
  • Sensory tool boxes for each child and program
  • The school program has a dedicated mental health clinician to support the inclusion of developmentally matched regulatory activities for the students so to assist in maintaining a state of regulation, coupled with an intervention team able to take students in the moment and provide co-regulation for children to assist them back into classroom learning activities.msv swimming pool

Like everywhere else I had visited up to this point, the staff at Mount Saint Vincent Home are dedicated, passionate and committed to making a difference in the lives of children.  I watched and listened to staff talk openly about their love of the work, the challenges it brings and most importantly the changes they feel privileged to be part of in the journey of these children.  Like all services operating with the public health system there were clearly challenges that the programs were having to manage and deal with, but that aside the Mount Saint Vincent team not unlike Sandhill, Cal Farley’s, Sumner Mental Health and Alexander Youth Network were thoughtful, authentic and so very respectful in their work with children and families.

In 2013 Mount Saint Vincent Home’s Creative Arts Therapy team published an awesome resource called, “Doodles, Dances and Ditties: A Somatosensory Handbook”.  This book is a collection of creative, sensory and movement based activities you can use to regulate children.   You can get it on their website http://www.msvhome.org or via amazon – where I see it now comes in a Kindle version.

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Alexander Youth Network

 

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In the last week of May I journeyed to beautiful Charlotte in North Carolina to spend the week with my colleagues at Alexander Youth Network (AYN).  AYN’s main campus or headquarters, and the home of it’s Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility (PRTF) and one of their Day Treatment Programs, is located on a picturesque 60 acre property with buildings nestled in a woodland area with open grounds and recreation areas for their clients.  This campus also houses facilities including a gym, indoor swimming pool and cafeteria.

AYN is a non profit community based organisation receiving funding from fees for services (medicaid, insurance and the like) as well as contributions from individuals, corporations, foundations and government agencies.  AYN serves children ages 5 to 18, who are referred from hospitals, physicians, parents, schools and from state and county organisations such as department of social services and juvenile justice.  AYN serve over 7000 children each year.

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Surrounding woodlands

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Woodland Trail

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Deep in the woodland trail

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Alexander Youth Network Grounds

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Onsite Playgrounds

AYN provide an array of mental health treatment for serious emotional and behavioural difficulities including: diagnostic and outpatient services, community based programs, multisytemic day therapy, therapeutic foster care and an onsite, 36 bed psychiatric residential treatment facility.  The idea being that children, young people and families accessing their services can move from service to service with established working relationships of trust within the one organisation.  Added to this is the strong grounding the staff have in child development, trauma, attachment and neurodevelopment as a core component of their orientation and ongoing training.

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It was a contrast to go from services that have decisively removed themselves from the medicaid system or appear to have more flexibility than is given from the public health system and as a result appear better funded and able to provide longer term intervention for their clients.  At AYN the financial resourcing struggle of service delivery was evident in comparison to the private services I had visited.  While the AYN staff were at times a bit despondent about this, I was nonetheless impressed at what they were offering and able to offer.  There is something about not having resources at your fingertips that can contribute to a creative resourcefulness and the team at AYN do this well.  In fact when it comes to neurodevelopmentally informed and respectful interventions AYN have lots to offer:

  • Individual therapy including EMDR, play therapy, sand tray and an awesome play room furnished largely by donation and financial grants
  • Art Therapy including pottery and their very own kiln
  • A ropes course for adventure therapy
  • A Labyrinth
  • Occupational Therapy with a motor and sensory furnished room including a swing and tunnels.
  • Physical Therapy
  • Reiki
  • Swimming
  • Vegetable and flower bed gardens and gardening program
  • Woodland walking trails
  • Playgrounds
  • Gym
  • Developmentally matched classrooms that afford children regular (every 10 – 15 mins) brain breaks and recreation
  • Classrooms that are highly sensory and provide calming, alerting and regulating activities including rocking chairs, bean bags, chill out areas and such
  • Bike program whereby each PRTF child has their own bike.

 

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Art Therapy room including Kiln

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Play Therapy Room

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Play Therapy equipment

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Play Therapy Room – role play and dress ups

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Play Therapy puppets

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Play Therapy sand tray and figures

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Occupational Therapy room

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Developmentally matched classrooms

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Chill out area in classroom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of more concern to me than their financial resourcing issues, were the systemic restrictions being placed on AYN in relation to the length of service delivery they are able to offer their clients.  The public health system funding children coming into the PRTF, those clients with the most serious of emotional and behavioural disturbances, are placing pressure on the service to treat and “repair” these children in 3 months.  The years of clinical practice, much of the theory out there, and my more recent acquisition of neurodevelopment and trauma expertise have taught me that it takes more than 3 months to form a trusting relationship with some of these kids.

 And we know that it is only in the context of such trusting relationships that these children can being to heal.

So with that knowledge I take my hat off to my colleagues at AYN and their ability to work within a public health system that places considerable restraint on their ability to really heal these kids.  The staff I met talked openly of the 30 day review process they have to undertake to retain or regain funding for ongoing work and the associated challenges. Despite this, the passion and commitment for their work and the children and families they serve sees them rise daily to these challenges and provide meaningful connections and healing opportunities for North Carolina’s more vulnerable citizens.

 

Therapeutic Preschool: The Safe Place

Sumner Mental Health Services provide therapeutic support to the Futures Unlimited Preschools in Wellington KS.  Specifically they provide support via the provision of Mental Health Case Management and a role called Individual Psychosocial Rehabilitation workers (IPR), for children classified with Severe Emotional Disturbance (SED).  Provision of these services is made available via the USA Medicaid system, and each of the children receiving these services must have met diagnostic classification to receive services.

I really want to spend time reflecting on the role of these IPR workers and the amazing early intervention and skill development they provide to kids between the ages of 0 – 6 years with respect to emotional regulation.  However before I do, one feature of the classrooms really stood out to me and I think there’s some direct application others may be able to use.

Firstly the therapeutic preschool enviornment, like our Kindergartens in Australia, are a wonderful sensory environment, with lots of different activity stations, bright and lively colour, lots of structured, predictable schedules and developmentally appropriate activities for children .  One of the things that Sumner Mental Health and Futures Unlimited have incorporated into their preschool classrooms, which really interested me was the SAFE PLACE.

In each room there is a corner where a little wall juts out and in this space are a variety of sensory toys.  The idea behind this space is that at any point during the day, when the students become dysregulated, upset or need some “emotional space”  they can take themselves to the “Safe Place” and chill out, calm down and then when ready rejoin the group.

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During my visit, I had opportunity to witness the “Safe Place” in action.  After lunch the preschool children had some outside exercise time in the playground.  One of the male students struggled with the transition from exercise to circle time on the mat when they came back into class.  This boy was not a child allocated an IPR who could sit with him, rock him, hug him or co-regulate him, so when his teacher attempted to move him into the next class activity he became upset and tearful.  Instead of creating a scene however or requiring the teacher to stop the class activity and attend to his emotional needs, I witnessed this child get up, take himself to the “Safe Space” corner and cuddle a big green frog.  He kept himself there for a couple of minutes, huddled in the little alcove, cuddling the frog and when he seemed to have calmed down, taking the frog from the safe space, he rejoined his classmates and was able to participate in the classroom activity.

What was clear to me was the expectation and permission that self regulatory self-removal from the activity was acceptable and in fact preferred.  There was little to no disruption to the preschool activity, the teaching or the other students and the time away from task for this child was minimal.  The materials provided in the “Safe Space” were highly sensory and what’s more,  just outside the wall of the “Safe Spaces” were mini trampoline’s for indoor physical movment & activity.  I also really liked that the children could bring items from the “Safe Space” as transitional items to help them rejoin the class, without any comment, restriction or intervention on part of the teacher.

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